Woodcut/Hedcut(ish) Effect



Rolf as a woodcut/hedcut

I was working on the About page over on PIXLS.US the other night. I was including some headshots of myself and one of Rolf Steinort when I got pulled off onto yet another tangent (this happens often to me).

The rest of my GIMP tutorials can be found here:

Something Wicked This Way Comes...

I've been working on something, and I figured that I should share it with anyone who actually reads the stuff I publish here.

I originally started writing here as a small attempt at bringing tutorials for doing high-quality photography using F/OSS to everyone. So far, it's been amazing and I've really loved meeting and getting to know many like-minded folks.

I'm not leaving. Having just re-read that previous paragraph makes it sound like I am. I'm not.

I am, however, working on something new that I'd like to share with you, though. I've called it:


I've been writing to hopefully help fill in some gaps on high-quality photographic processes using all of the amazing F/OSS tools that so many great groups have built, and now I think it's time to move that effort into its own home.

F/OSS photography deserves its own site focused on demonstrating just how amazing these projects are and how fantastic the results can be when using them.

I'm hoping pixls.us can be that home. Pixel-editing for all of us!

I'm been building the site in my spare time over the past couple of weeks (I'm building it from scratch, so it's going a little slower than just slapping up a wordpess/blogger/CMS site). I want the new site to focus on the content above all else, and to make it as accessible and attractive as possible for users. I also want to keep the quality of the content as high as possible.

If anyone would like to contribute anything to help out: expertise, artwork, images, tutorials and more, please feel free to contact me and let me know. I'm in the process of porting my old GIMP tutorials over to the new site (and probably updating/re-writing a bunch of it as well), so we can have at least some content to start out with.

If you want to follow along my progress at the moment while I build out the site, I'm blogging about it on the site itself at http://pixls.us/blog. As mentioned in the comments, I actually do have an RSS feed for the blog posts, I just hadn't linked to it yet (working on it quickly). The location (should your feedreader not pick it up automatically now) is: http://pixls.us/blog/feed.xml.

If you happen to subscribe in a feedreader, please let me know if anything looks off or broken so I can fix it! :)

Things are in a constant state of flux at the moment (did I mention that I'm still building out the back end?), so please bear with me. Please don't hesitate for a moment to let me know if something looks strange, or with any suggestions as well!

When it's ready to go, I'm going to ask for everyones help to get the word out, link to it, talk about it, etc. The sooner I can get it ready to go, the sooner we can help folks find out just how great these projects are and what they can do with them!

Excelsior!

Clarity in GIMP (Local Contrast + Mid Tones)

I was thinking about other ways I fiddle with Luminosity Masks recently, and I thought it might be fun to talk about some other ways to use them when looking at your images.

My previous ramblings about Luminosity Masks:
The rest of my GIMP tutorials can be found here:

If you remember from my previous look at Luminosity Masks, the idea is to create masks that correspond to different luminous levels in your image (roughly the lightness of tones). Once you have these masks, you can make adjustments to your image and isolate their effect to particular tonal regions easily.

Free From XP (LinuxPro Magazine) GIMP Article

So, the last time I talked about LinuxPro Magazine was about having a simple give-away of the promotional copies I had received of their GIMP Handbook issue. At that time, I joked with the editor that surely it couldn’t be complete without anything written by me. :)

Then he called me out on my joke and asked me if I wanted to write an article for them.

So, I’ve got an article in LinuxPro Magazine Special Edition #18: Free From XP!


The article is aimed at new users switching over from XP to Linux, so the stuff I cover is relatively basic, like:
  • The Interface
  • Cropping
  • Rotating
  • Correcting Levels
  • Brightness/Contrast
  • Color Levels
  • Curves
  • Resizing
  • Sharpening
  • Saving & Exporting
Still, if you know someone who could use a hand switching, it certainly can’t hurt to pick a copy up! (You can get print and digital copies from their website: LinuxPro Magazine).

Here’s a quick preview of the first page of the article:


My hair doesn’t look anywhere near as fabulous as this image would have you believe...

Also, if anyone sees a copy on a newsstand, it would be awesome if you could send me a quick snap of it.

Wavelet Decompose (Again)

Yes, more fun things you can do with Wavelet Scales.

If you’ve been reading this blog for a bit (or just read through any of my previous postprocessing tutorials), then you should be familiar with Wavelet Decompose. I use them all the time for skin retouching as well as other things. I find that being able to think of your images in terms of detail scales opens up a new way of approaching problems (and some interesting solutions).

A short discussion on the GIMP Users G+ community led the member +Marty Keil to suggest a tutorial on using wavelets for other things (particularly sharpening). Since I tend to use wavelet scales often in my processing (including sharpening), I figured I would sit down and enumerate some ways to use them, like:

Krita Kickstarter

Krita Kickstarter

I know that I primarily write about photography here, but sometimes something comes along that’s too important to pass up talking about.

Krita just happens to be one of those things. Krita is a digital painting and sketching software by artists for artists. While I love GIMP and have seen some incredible work by talented artists using it for painting and sketching, sometimes it’s better to use a dedicated tool for the job. This is where Krita really shines.

The reason I’m writing about Krita today is that they are looking for community support to accelerate development through their Kickstarter campaign.


That is where you come in. It doesn’t take much to make a difference in great software, and every little bit helps. If you can skip a fancy coffee, pastry, or one drink while out this month, consider using the money you saved to help a great project instead!

There’s only 9 days left in their Kickstarter, and they are less than €800 to hitting their goal of €15,000!


Metamorphosis by Enrico Guarnieri

Of course, the team makes it hard to keep up with them. They seem to be rapidly implementing goals in their Kickstarter before they even get funding. For instance, their “super-stretch” goal was to get an OSX implementation of Krita running. Then this shows up in my feed this morning. A prototype already!

I am in constant awe at the talent and results from digital artists, and this is a great tool to help them produce amazing works. As a photographer I am deeply indebted to those who helped support GIMP development over they years, and if we all pull together maybe we can be the ones who future Krita users thank for helping them get access to a great program...

Skip a few fancy coffee drinks, possibly inspire a future artist? Count me in!


Krita Kickstarter

Netflix Top 50 Covers by Genre (Averaged & Normalized)

In my (apparently) never-ending quest to average all the things, I happened to be surfing around Netflix the other evening looking for something to watch. Then a little light bulb went off!


I had previously blended many different variations of movie posters with varying success, but figured it might be interesting to see mean blends based on Netflix genres (and suggestions for me to watch). So, here are my results across a few different genres:


I found a couple of surprising and interesting things in these results...